Alert: SW101 will be closing down as of April 1, 2019. Read More.

recording ideas

 
       
 
Oct 21, 2004, 02:21 PM

    I want to share a couple of things that i’ve started to find while working on my first CD. I’m recording it by myself on a 16 track digital recorder. I want to throw out some ideas and see hopefully it’s helpful to you and hopefully you have some cooler ways of doing things that you can share with me.

acoustic guitar - I play a custom Cort acoustic guitar. I love it. It sounds great. But most people know that even a great sounding pick-up is hard-pressed to sound as good as a mic’d guitar. But the pick-ups bring a really cool sound the mix as well. Here is what I did to get two guitar tracks, an organic mic’d sound, and a full bodied plugged in sound. I plugged my guitar into the input of my “studio” and I put a microphone right about where the neck meets the soundhole. I set the recorder on “muli-track” and just played the song. This allowed me to have an automatic doubled guitar track that was exactly the same on both tracks and I could mix it so that the best of both sounds was sitting correctly in the mix. I’m sure I’m not the first that has done this but I was proud of myself for coming up with it all alone.

multiple guitars - One thing I love to do is to use multiple guitars on each song. More importantly I love to use multiple chord voicings. Example: your recording a song that is just a basic G - C - D progression. You play the chords open because that’s usually the best for sound when your performing. After you record your basic guitar track. Go back over and over dub another track using the barred version of those chords. Try using a capo and finding the open chord shape that will give you the original chord. For example if you capo to the 7th fret a C chord shape will sound a G. So try using different voicings on top of eachother.

a quick note on reverb - Just one more thing. Reverb is a great tool I use it on vocals and every now and then on a guitar. But one thing that you want to consider. If you want something to come out in the mix, REDUCE THE REVERB. Reverb can sweeten a sound but it also makes a little spacier and makes it sit “back” in the mix. If you want a sweet guitar line to really come out . . . be stingy on the reverb. This is a guidline. Obviously some souns are really cool drenched in reverb but be careful.


I hope my little bits of advice have helped. They’re hardly revolutionary and I’m by no means a pro. But I hope you’ve gotten something from this. Post some of you’r own ideas and let’s get some good recording coversations going.


nate

 
     
nate dennis Joined Oct 19, 2004
  • Rank

Send PM

 
Oct 21, 2004, 03:25 PM

Thanks for the tips.  I have to second the “REDUCE THE REVERB” tip.  Reverb is something that should be used much more sparingly in demos. 

David F. Bills
Webmaster @ Broadcast Music, Inc. (BMI)
New York, NY USA
http://bmi.com

 
     
dfbills Joined Jan 01, 2004
  • Rank
  • Rank
  • Rank

Send PM

 
Oct 29, 2004, 06:31 PM

cool idea. I’ll have to try that.

 
     
nate dennis Joined Oct 19, 2004
  • Rank

Send PM

 
Jan 14, 2005, 10:02 PM

Nate, another way to reduce phasing is to eq them differently, ie. one track you concentrate on bringing out the mid frequency, the other the low frequency, and pan them away from each other. That should add a different feel for you in the mix. There are also some good books on engineering that will help you understand the frequencies of different instruments including the guitar.
Have fun.

 
     
michael white Joined Jan 13, 2005
  • Rank

Send PM

 
Jun 10, 2005, 10:39 AM

Hi Nate,
On my 16 track digital recorder I have effects on board. Not sure if you have the same thing, but I usually record my tracks dry (no effects such as reverb, chorus, etc…) Then after I am satisfied with the sound of the dry recording I will add effects only to enhance the sound. Acoustic guitars usually sound good with just a touch of reverb, and chorus. I do all of my EQ once I place the instrument in the proper placement of the left/right spectrum. I do this so frequencies dont clash with one another.
Hope these little tips help whoever reads this thread.
Tony Malone

 
     
Anthony 19 Joined Jun 10, 2005
  • Rank

Send PM