Composers & Bands wanted!

 
       
 
Oct 27, 2015, 08:01 AM

We, at the Audio Cabin, are seeking talented composers, bands and singer/songwriters for our public launch in early 2016.
The Audio Cabin is a new, modern royalty free music marketplace, offering high-quality music for productions that value a great soundtrack.
We are now accepting applications in order to preselect potential artists for our initial roster.

Apply today by sending us a link to your very best work.


Visit http://bit.ly/aucabin to find out more.


We can’t wait to hear from you!
The Audio Cabin

 
     
John2015 Joined Oct 27, 2015
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Oct 27, 2015, 08:45 AM

Wow. A “new, modern” music marketplace ,where everyone puts their product they paid for up on a platform that is “royalty free”, so they can get nothing for it. Hmm. sounds like the rest of the music business. Nothing modern about that.

MAB

 
     
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MBarne4908 Joined Jul 29, 2010
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Oct 27, 2015, 09:58 AM

Hi John,
I checked out your website. Here in this thread you write that you are looking for composers, bands and songwriters. That doesn’t really match what I found on your website where you are looking for artists only.

I have a few questions.

- The headline says “THE HOME FOR ROYALTY FREE MUSIC”. It says “even as a Non-Exclusive you earn above-average”. If nobody collects royalties, how do you make money? Do listeners have to pay to listen to the music? How much is above average?
- You say: “Our goal is to make the cash flow as transparent as possible.” How is cash flow generated? Who pays, who collects and how do the artists get paid? How much does the songwriter get? Anything at all?
- You say: “We will get you and your music out there by feeding our social networks and marketing channels. Weekly and monthly features will put you into the spotlight and drive traffic to your account.” This sounds like a pay per click deal. The more people listen to your song, the more money you earn. How much do you pay the artist per click?
- You say: “Discuss recent topics, share your latest work, get inspired, connect and collaborate with other members to create unique music in all kinds of genres.” You’re probably new to Songwriter101. That’s exactly what this site is all about.

From what I read I couldn’t find any hint why I should submit my songs. I’m a songwriter and your site is for artists only.

Take care
Robert

 
     
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Robert Baitinger Joined Jun 01, 2006
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Oct 27, 2015, 11:00 AM
Marc-Alan Barnette - 27 October 2015 08:45 AM

Wow. A “new, modern” music marketplace ,where everyone puts their product they paid for up on a platform that is “royalty free”, so they can get nothing for it. Hmm. sounds like the rest of the music business. Nothing modern about that.

MAB

Hi MAB,
“royalty free” does NOT mean you get nothing.

 
     
John2015 Joined Oct 27, 2015
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Oct 27, 2015, 11:23 AM

John,

Robert just asked you the right questions. If you do not collect royalties, WHAT are you paying? Are you just giving money away to songwriters?

“Audio Cabin is a new, modern royalty free music marketplace, offering high-quality music for productions that value a great soundtrack.”

What does that even mean? A “soundtrack” is something that accompanies video or is in the “background of a production.”
Artists and composers ALREADY appreciate at a “great soundtrack. They are MAKING the great soundtrack.

So how are they getting paid? Or do you think there is some enormous amount of pile and piles of money out there just floating around waiting for it to filter down to songwriters?

That is what every Internet based company claims. And Spotify, Pandora, and the like collect billions. But they pay out less than pennies.

So answer some of Robert’s questions please. Love to see how you differ from the rest of the Internet and what you will be doing differently.

MAB

 
     
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MBarne4908 Joined Jul 29, 2010
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Oct 27, 2015, 11:24 AM
Robert Baitinger - 27 October 2015 09:58 AM

Hi John,
I checked out your website. Here in this thread you write that you are looking for composers, bands and songwriters. That doesn’t really match what I found on your website where you are looking for artists only.

I have a few questions.

- The headline says “THE HOME FOR ROYALTY FREE MUSIC”. It says “even as a Non-Exclusive you earn above-average”. If nobody collects royalties, how do you make money? Do listeners have to pay to listen to the music? How much is above average?
- You say: “Our goal is to make the cash flow as transparent as possible.” How is cash flow generated? Who pays, who collects and how do the artists get paid? How much does the songwriter get? Anything at all?
- You say: “We will get you and your music out there by feeding our social networks and marketing channels. Weekly and monthly features will put you into the spotlight and drive traffic to your account.” This sounds like a pay per click deal. The more people listen to your song, the more money you earn. How much do you pay the artist per click?
- You say: “Discuss recent topics, share your latest work, get inspired, connect and collaborate with other members to create unique music in all kinds of genres.” You’re probably new to Songwriter101. That’s exactly what this site is all about.

From what I read I couldn’t find any hint why I should submit my songs. I’m a songwriter and your site is for artists only.

Take care
Robert

Hi Robert,
thanks for your comment. The company is in a very early stage, I think that’s obvious.
- Actually, for now, we are only scouting artists to build our initial catalogue. Before we can license music on behalf of the composer, we need to place that music on our website. For us, musicians, bands and songwriters are artists, by the way. We do not publish anything yet. We are only asking for a link to a portfolio to see who might fit our concept.
- a “royalty free music library” is licensing music to a production company and the artist gets a commission. So, it’s “pay per license”. We can’t make the exact share public, yet, but it probably starts at 50% for non-exclusive tracks. That’s clearly above-average.

I hope I could help.

 
     
John2015 Joined Oct 27, 2015
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Oct 27, 2015, 01:13 PM

CD Baby gives the ‘artists’ (creators and performers in personal union) 90% PLUS collects the royalties from other distributors. These (Amazon, iTunes etc.) pay a share of about 70 to 75%. Compared to your advised 50% that looks a lot more interesting. And they don’t insist on ‘royalty free’ stuff (music that is not registered with a PRO).

I cannot even wish you success since that would mean giving other songwriters and artists poor advice.

Bernd

Bernd
good lyricist, mediocre songwriter, lousy musician;
likes rock, writes for anybody anyway
http://bernd-harmsen.com

 
     
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Bernd Harmsen Joined May 31, 2009
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Oct 27, 2015, 02:01 PM
Bernd Harmsen - 27 October 2015 01:13 PM

CD Baby gives the ‘artists’ (creators and performers in personal union) 90% PLUS collects the royalties from other distributors. These (Amazon, iTunes etc.) pay a share of about 70 to 75%. Compared to your advised 50% that looks a lot more interesting. And they don’t insist on ‘royalty free’ stuff (music that is not registered with a PRO).

I cannot even wish you success since that would mean giving other songwriters and artists poor advice.

Bernd

That’s not right. It seems you don’t know what a royalty free music library actually is. If you buy music on amazon, itunes or cdbaby, you can’t do anything with it. You do not have the license to use the music for a video project or commercial production. You can listen to it. That’s it. That’s why you only have to pay 1 dollar. Prices for production music are (should be) much higher, and so is the revenue for the “artist”.

 
     
John2015 Joined Oct 27, 2015
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Oct 28, 2015, 06:15 AM

Hi John,
thanks for the additional information. Yes, it actually did help understand your concept a bit better. I’m a member of the German GEMA and because of that I can’t offer any music for royalty-free libraries.

Take care
Robert

 
     
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Robert Baitinger Joined Jun 01, 2006
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Oct 28, 2015, 06:35 AM
Robert Baitinger - 28 October 2015 06:15 AM

Hi John,
thanks for the additional information. Yes, it actually did help understand your concept a bit better. I’m a member of the German GEMA and because of that I can’t offer any music for royalty-free libraries.

Take care
Robert

Hi Robert,
glad to hear that. And yes. Unfortunately it’s complicated with the GEMA.
Once we are online, we will only offer “performance royalty free” music, means we only accept music that’s not registered with any PRO.
But there are plans to include registered tracks in the future, as well.

All the best!

 
     
John2015 Joined Oct 27, 2015
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Oct 28, 2015, 07:52 AM

im sorry if this a stupid question (I don’t know much about this subject) , but if a song is accepted onto your royalty free music site , does that song then become a public domain song , that can be altered or chopped up by anyone , under a creative commons license . sorry if its a stupid question , whenever I hear the words royalty free music , I immediately think public domain

 
     
sandor nevery Joined Jun 08, 2014
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Oct 28, 2015, 08:28 AM
sandor nevery - 28 October 2015 07:52 AM

im sorry if this a stupid question (I don’t know much about this subject) , but if a song is accepted onto your royalty free music site , does that song then become a public domain song , that can be altered or chopped up by anyone , under a creative commons license . sorry if its a stupid question , whenever I hear the words royalty free music , I immediately think public domain

Hi Sandor,
thanks for the question. Royalty Free Music has nothing to do with creative common licenses. You always retain your copyright.
I don’t like the word “free” in “royalty free” neither, because it’s confusing and people think they give away their music for free.
“Royalty Free” means, the license holder has the right to use the music track for (commercial) media productions, without having to pay continual royalties. Nevertheless, if the music is registered with a PRO like ASCAP, the license holder has to/should fill out a cue sheet and send it to the PRO, so the musician can receive the performance royalties, payed by the broadcasting company (NOT by the production company)
Hope I could help.

 
     
John2015 Joined Oct 27, 2015
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Oct 28, 2015, 10:53 AM

Hey John,
I did acknowledge that my songs don’t qualify since I am a member of a royalty collecting organization (GEMA) and I thought I basically understood how your concept works but you lost me with your response to Sandor.

You guys sell licenses of “royalty free” music to production companies and you get a commission which you share with the artist/songwriter/musician. So for example if Sony is making a new movie and wants to use a song from your music library in their movie, they pay you for one license (pay per license). Let’s say Sony uses the song in their movie and they distribute the movie to cinemas and they sell the movie on DVDs and at internet download portals and streaming providers. If I get you right, Sony has to fill out a cue sheet and send it to the PRO. How does Sony know which PRO they have to send that to? Why should Sony do that in the first place because they bought the license from you and you state that the music is “royalty free”.

You wrote me that you only accept music that is not registered with any PRO. In your response to Sandor you wrote “… if the music is registered with a PRO the license holder should fill out …”. I’m sorry, but now I’m totally confused.

Take care
Robert

 
     
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Robert Baitinger Joined Jun 01, 2006
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Oct 28, 2015, 11:43 AM
Robert Baitinger - 28 October 2015 10:53 AM

Hey John,
I did acknowledge that my songs don’t qualify since I am a member of a royalty collecting organization (GEMA) and I thought I basically understood how your concept works but you lost me with your response to Sandor.

You guys sell licenses of “royalty free” music to production companies and you get a commission which you share with the artist/songwriter/musician. So for example if Sony is making a new movie and wants to use a song from your music library in their movie, they pay you for one license (pay per license). Let’s say Sony uses the song in their movie and they distribute the movie to cinemas and they sell the movie on DVDs and at internet download portals and streaming providers. If I get you right, Sony has to fill out a cue sheet and send it to the PRO. How does Sony know which PRO they have to send that to? Why should Sony do that in the first place because they bought the license from you and you state that the music is “royalty free”.

You wrote me that you only accept music that is not registered with any PRO. In your response to Sandor you wrote “… if the music is registered with a PRO the license holder should fill out …”. I’m sorry, but now I’m totally confused.

Take care
Robert

Hey Robert,
sorry for the confusion. When I answered Sanders question and wrote about registered music, I was not talking about the Audio Cabin. There are companies that sell “royalty free” tracks that are registered with a PRO. Truly royalty free music is not registered, so the client hasn’t to worry about anything, does not have to pay annual fees for rights managed music. He pays for the license ONCE and is good to go.

Your example with Sony is correct. Performance royalties are related to registered music. Since this topic is pretty complex, check out this link to find out more about cue sheets: http://www.ascap.com/playback/2005/winter/features/cuesheets.aspx

And for a complete overview, this might help: http://www.ascap.com/licensing/licensingfaq.aspx#general

As you can see, the cue sheet contains all composers and publishers and their respective PRO. So if Sony is using a track that’s registered with the GEMA, ASCAP would forward the royalties to the GEMA and the GEMA pays the composer/publisher.
There are plenty of websites out there that explain the business of music licensing in all aspects. I think that goes beyond the scope of this discussion.

 
     
John2015 Joined Oct 27, 2015
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