Giving Songwriting Credit to A Star for a cut.

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Feb 11, 2018, 10:25 AM

If a Star wanted to sing your song but insisted on having co credit as the writer would you say YES? I think that sucks but I would do it.

 
     
Barry Butler Joined Oct 11, 2017
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Feb 11, 2018, 12:57 PM

You can always say “NO.” But most people would feel the cut and the impact on your overall career, far outweighs the credit issue. And you can always have 100% of NOTHING.

There are things called “PROPRIETARY INTEREST” in songs. Let me put it to you like this:

Imagine you are a successful recording artist. You have spent years if not decades, building a career. Working so much BEHIND the scenes, nearly starving, at times going without money or support, having to continually forge your own way. After YEARS of doing this you have built yourself into a position you are surviving it and actually doing well. Other people are attracted to you. People you have known for years, people who have supported you, people who have helped PROVIDE you the success you have. In many ways, the reason you ARE WHERE YOU ARE.

Now, whenever you record something, there are a lot of ramifications to it. It costs money to record and promote. Jobs are on the line. People you employ are affected by the success or failure. And putting anything on your projects, actually DEPRIVE some of those people of lively hood, reputation, income. Not to say YOUR OWN vision for YOUR career.

So if someone brings you something that you are NOT attached to, as an active PARTICIPANT, (co-writer, publisher, or have an active “proprietary” stake in) it not only does NOT bring as much to you, as something else would, it NEGATIVELY IMPACTS other people.

So as a writer, you are trying to use ANYTHING you can to increase your odds on getting a cut. IF that takes crediting other people, or aquiesing to their rules,  sometimes you have to do that. And you have to look at a BIGGER PICTURE. IF THAT cut, led you to OTHER CUTS a and larger successes, with each one, you being able to CONTROL more of your own share, then would you do it?

MAB

 
     
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MBarne4908 Joined Jul 29, 2010
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Feb 11, 2018, 01:26 PM

Why do you think it’s so important today to have the singers on as writers…? It seems like they are all on it as one of three. Does it make them look more important?

 
     
Barry Butler Joined Oct 11, 2017
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Feb 11, 2018, 01:49 PM

No. Because if they are NOT writers on the song, the record companies who are promoting them the publishing companies (who they have deals with and are paying them) their inner circles, the people that helped them get where they are, the favors they owe to many, many people, are not going to be repaid. So if they are NOT writers on the song or have a proprietary interest in the song, they are NOT EVEN GOING TO CONSIDER IT IN THE FIRST PLACE.
The money is already so small on songs themselves it is about CONTROL of the product.

So it is basically, “if you want a cut, you are going to share the song. Or not. Your choice.”
Has nothing to do with “making them look good.” Has to do with Market share and control of the product.

And new writers have no say over it. Writing control, as well as publishing are part of what you give up to get in the door. It used to be only publishing. Then publishing dissapeared due to the era of FREE MUSIC. (The Internet). So now it is about “PROPRIETARY INTEREST. ” I just outlined to you how that works.

MAB

 
     
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MBarne4908 Joined Jul 29, 2010
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Feb 11, 2018, 01:53 PM

Now, there is another way to approach this if you are a writer. YOU pony up the money to record, promote, distribute, advertise, the song. This can be up to Four million dollars now. So you can participate in a share of that and you can retain all your rights, publishing, etc.

All of this does come down to MONEY. It costs VAST SUMS OF MONEY to put these things out there in the majors. If you are not participating in the COSTS of doing business, you are not going to benefit from the REWARDS of doing business.

And this is nothing new Almost every songwriter in history gave up percentages on songs in their early years. They did that to get their feet in the game, and then as time went on and they developed reputation and demand for their product, they renegotiated, formed their own publishing companies, and had more control over their product.

It’s business. Not personal.

MAB

 
     
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MBarne4908 Joined Jul 29, 2010
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Feb 11, 2018, 01:58 PM

Incidentally Barry, why they are “one of three” when it comes to writing, is because usually it is one artist, writing WITH one or two experienced writers. Usually the artist, provides the emotion, the details, the circumstances of the song, and the pro writers put it into context, provide technical aspects, the artist (who are usually younger) have not yet developed the skills to do.
Also, more and more now, the artists ARE PART OWNERS in their publishing companies. So they are being involved in self preservation in the songs and all sides of their careers.

This is the other reason it is nearly impossible to GET THINGS HEARD from an outside writer and why you need to develop relationships with UNSIGNED ARTISTS, so that when THEY ARE signed, you are involved with them from the ground floor. You ARE part of their inside circles.
At the beginning of a career for a writer, it is about ACCESS to ARTISTS. Once they are signed, you have no access to them. They don’t listen to outside songs or take “Unsolicited material.”

MAB

 
     
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MBarne4908 Joined Jul 29, 2010
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Feb 11, 2018, 02:48 PM

Barry,

Let me see if I can approach this from a different perspective. The biggest problems most writers have is that they don’t consider the bigger picture. They only think about “songs” as if that is the only consideration. So look at it like this.

Think of what it is you do for a living. The years you spent climbing the ladder. The hours you put in working really crappy jobs, establishing not only your skills, but the contacts you’ve made, the people who have helped you along. The people who enabled you to get a job to help support your family, buy something your child needed, etc.

So you finally get to a point where you are just about to kick into your own, and be very solid in your vocation. How many people would you put in front of you? How many people would you suggest to do things in your place, to make money that would have gone to you?
Particularly people you don’t really know, people who’s work is in your opinion, not as good as your own?

Now, you start to see the reason people need to view this in a larger context. Hope it makes sense.

MAB

 
     
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MBarne4908 Joined Jul 29, 2010
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Feb 12, 2018, 12:13 AM

Nashville Songwriters Association International (NSAI) has a motto: It all begins with a Song.

A singer without a Song is just a guy standing at a microphone.

If you own a Song you own 100% of the rights to Songwriting Royalties, if any are earned, and 100% of Publishing Royalties, if any are earned. (That’s 200%). Until the Song gets to market where it can earn Royalties you own 200% of zero profit. You still own 200% of the Song. That Song is 100% of your whole business.

A Publishing Company might offer you a contract to let them Publish the Song, pitching it to artists, trying to get it Cut and Released to market where it might earn Royalties. In exchange for doing that work, they ask for a share of the potential Publishing Royalties. They might want 100% of Publishing Royalties, leaving you 100% of Songwriting Royalties. They have 100% of their company, a building, furniture, a catalog of Songs already in rotation, earning money. They’re not offering you a share of their company’s profits.

An artist and his company might decide to Cut and Release your Song. They have the artist’s name, the band, the instruments, the tour bus, the profits from playing venues, selling CD’s or downloads, merchandise like hats and t-shirts and pictures and whatever else their fans will buy. They own 100% of their company. They’re not offering you a share of their profits.

Since you’re not making any money with your Song you own 100% of no profit. You still own 100% of your Song.

And now here’s Oprah to offer to share your 100% of no profit: You get 100%! You get 100%! You get 100%!

That was generous of you to share your 100% of no profit. You still own 100% of your Song.

Sharing some percentage of the 100% you do own is your negotiating asset. If someone wants it they might negotiate for that privilege, to get you to make or take a deal, 100% of Publishing Royalties, or some lesser percentage. How badly do they want your Song? How badly do you want a Publisher?

The artist’s company might want a share of Songwriting Royalties. If you just ‘negotiated’ away 100% of Publishing Royalties that 100% of Songwriting Royalties is all you have left, so every share you give up in negotiation cuts into your potential profit. They still own 100% of their Publishing Company, 100% of their Record Label, 100% of their artist, sales of CD’s, hats t-shirts, ticket sales. You didn’t get to trade a share of your company’s 100% Song for a share of their companies’ profits. They might have blackmailed you, saying, “If you don’t give us a share of your company we won’t sing your Song. We won’t get it to market where it CAN earn Royalties. You have 100% of nothing.”

Actually, you only have 100% of no profit. You still own 100% of your Song. That’s your leverage. You have it. They want it. They need it. They’re trying to be in the Publishing business, the Recording business, the Entertainment business, but without YOUR Song they don’t have it to Publish, or Record, or Entertain with. If they don’t want it badly enough to make a deal reasonably favorable to you maybe somebody else will. If you want their artist to do your Song badly enough, maybe you’ll take their deal They’ll try to make a deal favorable to them. You have to try to make a deal favorable to you. What percentage of your ‘company’, your Song, are you willing to give up?

Elvis never wrote a Song. Colonel Parker, his manager, made Songwriters give up a share of Songwriting Royalties. You’ll see Elvis listed as a Songwriter on all his stuff. Dolly Parton turned him down for “I Will Always Love You”, because it had already been a big hit. That killed the deal. Elvis would have had a huge hit and Dolly would have made a fortune. Dolly made a fortune anyway. It’s a great Song and everybody paid her for the privilege of using it to promote their artist, their band, their company, without blackmailing her to give up a share of Songwriting Royalties. You ain’t Dolly Parton. You and your Song aren’t a proven commodity.

When hard-copy vinyl and CD sales began to crash the record companies crashed. They always took 100% of profits from record sales, telling artists to go tour and make their money merchandising and from ticket sales. The promotion and distribution connections of the Publishers and Labels got the artists airplay, making them famous, driving people to their shows. When the hard-copy device industry crashed with digital sales and the public ‘burning’ recordings for their friends those companies came back and started negotiating with artists for a share of ticket sales and merchandising.

You decide. How badly do you want to make a deal? You decide. The 100% of nothing argument is blackmail. ‘Give us the Song and no one gets hurt.’ It’s a bully’s argument. If you believe in your Song and have the legs to shop it around to other ‘consumers’, other artists, publishers, record labels, maybe you could make a better deal with someone else. You decide. If you aren’t ambitious enough to try to find another ‘buyer’ maybe you should take the one deal you’re offered. It was hard enough just to get one offer. If they get it to market your remaining share, 50%, 33 and 1/3%, whatever deal you signed your name to, might be enough to satisfy your needs. Or they might earn a lot of money with what their companies sell AND a share of your money, and your share is great anyway. You decide. 100% of no profit is not the same as 100% of YOUR Song. http://www.copyright.gov Educate yourself. Your company needs an educated owner.

There will always be another song to be written. Someone will write it. Why not you? http://www.garyeandrews.com

 
     
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Gary E. Andrews Joined Apr 12, 2005
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Feb 12, 2018, 05:06 AM
MBarne4908 - 11 February 2018 01:58 PM

Also, more and more now, the artists ARE PART OWNERS in their publishing companies. So they are being involved in self preservation in the songs and all sides of their careers.

But that´s not a “new thing”.

During the 1950th, so more then 60 years ago, credits were given to the writer, artist and producer.
Many Bands of the 1960th founded their own publishing company. Some even found their own record label.

Look at the Beatles: Apple Records. Set up 1967 if I am not mistaken.
The Beach Boys: They founded their “Sea of tunes” publishing company 1962. 1966 they set up"Brother Records”..

Bon Jovi has it´s own publishing company… so doin this, is already established ...

...every once in a while, I get in the mood or so…and start to play..

http://www.songcycle.org

 
     
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Martin G Joined May 27, 2009
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Feb 12, 2018, 09:52 AM

Yes, you have 100% of a completely unproven commodity, of which of he 12 billion a year released. less than 500 earn any significant income.
You have no established track record, no contacts, no ability to get that song TO anyone. Thereby no way to earn dollar one.
You don’t share in the publishing or record companies, their failures, which vastly out number their gains, you don’t share in the costs and expenses of building that or the decades it took to get there.

But you do have 100% of something that is earning nothing. Good for you.

There was no blackmailing of Dolly Parton. Simply that was the deal, she decided not to take it. She did fine. Elvis did fine.
Jimmie Rodgers had a similar situation on one song, “It’s Over”. they made the deal that they got half the publishing on the song on one record, Aloha from Hawaii. Jimmie now lives on a cliff in Hawaii.

There are costs of doing business, and NOT ONE PERSON ever has to do anything. They can sit in their living rooms, have their songs on the internet, or form their own publishing companies, develop their own stars, spend the money nessasary to build market share.

Everyone can do that. Yes, it BEGINS with a song. And there are BILLIONS of beginnings. Not to many finishes. Because there are several MILLION steps and conditions that have to happen AFTER THAT.

But most songs will always earn nothing, so the point is quite moot.

MAB

 
     
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MBarne4908 Joined Jul 29, 2010
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Feb 12, 2018, 12:04 PM

Yes, moot; meaning ‘debatable’.

Marc Alan Barnette presents THEIR argument for YOU giving them a deal favorable to them.

QUOTE:
Yes, you have 100% of a completely unproven commodity, of which of he 12 billion a year released. less than 500 earn any significant income.
You have no established track record, no contacts, no ability to get that song TO anyone. Thereby no way to earn dollar one.
You don’t share in the publishing or record companies, their failures, which vastly out number their gains, you don’t share in the costs and expenses of building that or the decades it took to get there.

But you do have 100% of something that is earning nothing. Good for you.

There was no blackmailing of Dolly Parton. Simply that was the deal, she decided not to take it. She did fine. Elvis did fine.
Jimmie Rodgers had a similar situation on one song, “It’s Over”. they made the deal that they got half the publishing on the song on one record, Aloha from Hawaii. Jimmie now lives on a cliff in Hawaii.

There are costs of doing business, and NOT ONE PERSON ever has to do anything. They can sit in their living rooms, have their songs on the internet, or form their own publishing companies, develop their own stars, spend the money nessasary to build market share.

Everyone can do that. Yes, it BEGINS with a song. And there are BILLIONS of beginnings. Not to many finishes. Because there are several MILLION steps and conditions that have to happen AFTER THAT.

But most songs will always earn nothing, so the point is quite moot.
END QUOTE


See how desperate YOU are? You unproven commodity you. You don’t share in their failures. Of course they don’t share in yours either. Unless you have Oprah pass out the shares in your 100% of nothing, I mean, 100% of no profit. You still own 100% of your Song. And that ain’t nothing. But YOU don’t matter. It’s all about them and what’s favorable to them.

And those poor Publishers and Recording Company Executives can hardly pay for their Mercedes, let alone the yacht they sail around the Caribbean on in the wintertime.

It’s like the tobacco industry. If you don’t smoke and die they won’t be able to send their kids to college. 480,000 of their consumers die every year. If they don’t replace them they’re out of business. Is that what you want? Well is it?

You don’t share the costs and failures it took for them to get their yacht… AND they didn’t share in yours to get to whatever point you’re at. It’s a false argument that you’re just a parasite on their success. It ALL begins with a Song. And you’ve got the Song. You own the Song. 100% of the Song. Your Song is worth as much as their whole company. It IS YOUR whole company. If they could write a hit they would. Sometimes they do. Most of the time they need someone else’s Song.

Their failures vastly outnumber their gains? How can they stay in business and pay for those big offices, that Mercedes, that yacht, and send their kids to college? You can’t afford to send your kids to college. How do these ‘failures’ do it? Maybe, just maybe, if you negotiate a deal favorable to you, you can buy a modest car, live in a modest house, and send YOUR kids to college. Not a great college. After all, you’re nothing…but a Songwriter. You created the Song. You own the Song. You decide. Make a deal. Negotiate. Don’t let them convince you there is no way to heaven but through them.

There will always be another song to be written. Someone will write it. Why not you? http://www.garyeandrews.com

 
     
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Gary E. Andrews Joined Apr 12, 2005
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Feb 12, 2018, 12:27 PM

Gary,

How do they drive those Mercedes and pay for their yachts?

The same way home run hitters fail most of the time they come to bat. The same way most gamblers fail the majority of the time. The same way most businesses fail. They hit big on some things and those pay for all the failures.
And you’re giving off a false argument yourselves, because there are only a very few major labels and publishers that have all those things. Most people don’t. Most are small businesses. And most ARE doing the development and all the things I talked about.

You are looking at songs in a vacuum and that is just not the truth. It is like telling someone who pours a concrete foundation for a house that they are ALL that is required for the house to sell. Is it important? Sure. Without that nothing else gets built. But until there are walls, a roof, plumbing, drywall, paint, electrical fixtures, and all the other things that make people interested in houses, go up, NO BODY IS GOING TO BUY THEM.

You are overstating the value of songs which is what has happened over the past 20 years. the overall value of songs themselves have almost disappeared due to supply and demand. enormous supply, finite demand.

The problem I have with this argument is that it is always made by people who have very little understanding of the real world of the music industry. I’ve never heard a hit writer saying the entire reason they got into doing any of this is for the money. Money is generally not a factor till later in the game. Yet, that seems to be ALL anyone in the Cyberworld seems to think about. They don’t think about learning craft, development, making sure they have things WORTH money than actually delivering something that IS worth money.

But again, ANYONE HAS 100% OF THEIR SONGS AND 100% of their publishing. They don’t HAVE to give anything away. They can keep it all to themselves. No one bends anyone’s arm to do this. No one forces anyone to participate. And through the Internet they have the platform they can use to put their music out there and charge what they want for it.

If you want to play in the music industry everyone else has to, then the rules change because it is a different ballgame. You can complain about it, you can moan about it, and you can NOT PARTICIPATE. Everyone has a choice.
Life ain’t fair. Never has been. Get used to it.

MAB

 
     
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MBarne4908 Joined Jul 29, 2010
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Feb 12, 2018, 12:35 PM
Barry Butler - 11 February 2018 10:25 AM

If a Star wanted to sing your song but insisted on having co credit as the writer would you say YES? I think that sucks but I would do it.

You know, anyone who would put their spin on your melody and lyrics is also going to put their spin on your music. And, of course, they’re going to want it to be engineered and produced their way…............... For me I suppose it would depend on “the Star”, and whether or not that Star actually does the song better than “Me”  :)

 
     
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JAPOV Joined Jul 02, 2006
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Feb 12, 2018, 08:51 PM

QUOTE:
Feb 12, 2018, 12:27 PM
Gary,

How do they drive those Mercedes and pay for their yachts?

The same way home run hitters fail most of the time they come to bat. The same way most gamblers fail the majority of the time. The same way most businesses fail. They hit big on some things and those pay for all the failures.
And you’re giving off a false argument yourselves, because there are only a very few major labels and publishers that have all those things. Most people don’t. Most are small businesses. And most ARE doing the development and all the things I talked about.

You are looking at songs in a vacuum and that is just not the truth. It is like telling someone who pours a concrete foundation for a house that they are ALL that is required for the house to sell. Is it important? Sure. Without that nothing else gets built. But until there are walls, a roof, plumbing, drywall, paint, electrical fixtures, and all the other things that make people interested in houses, go up, NO BODY IS GOING TO BUY THEM.

You are overstating the value of songs which is what has happened over the past 20 years. the overall value of songs themselves have almost disappeared due to supply and demand. enormous supply, finite demand.

The problem I have with this argument is that it is always made by people who have very little understanding of the real world of the music industry. I’ve never heard a hit writer saying the entire reason they got into doing any of this is for the money. Money is generally not a factor till later in the game. Yet, that seems to be ALL anyone in the Cyberworld seems to think about. They don’t think about learning craft, development, making sure they have things WORTH money than actually delivering something that IS worth money.

But again, ANYONE HAS 100% OF THEIR SONGS AND 100% of their publishing. They don’t HAVE to give anything away. They can keep it all to themselves. No one bends anyone’s arm to do this. No one forces anyone to participate. And through the Internet they have the platform they can use to put their music out there and charge what they want for it.

If you want to play in the music industry everyone else has to, then the rules change because it is a different ballgame. You can complain about it, you can moan about it, and you can NOT PARTICIPATE. Everyone has a choice.
Life ain’t fair. Never has been. Get used to it.

MAB

Marc

That’s a good analogy. I never thought of it that way. Without walls, a roof, plumbing, drywall, electricals, they can’t sell a house. But without a foundation you can’t put up walls and stuff. And I’m not trying to sell the house. I’m just selling the foundation. And this lady wants me to do it for half price. Like Nashville Foundation Association International says, It all begins with a foundation.

But at least you kept it on a level of rational discussion and civil exchange and didn’t resort to telling me I’m living in a vacuum and my point of view is not the truth, all I’m thinking about is money, implying that I’m just complaining and moaning. That would be the epitome of political incorrectness and anyone who has to be told what they’re saying is politically incorrect… well… I’d probably have to be somewhat insulting to do that. And I’m just not that kind of guy.

Giving up a share of Songwriting Royalties to get a Cut IS about money.

We’re in agreement on one thing though. Nobody has to take the deal offered by someone who is trying to get them to pour a foundation for half price. One of the most powerful tactics of a ‘buyer’ is to walk away when the ‘seller’ will not budge off an unreasonable deal and negotiate. They’ll either let you walk or call you back. Either way you still own your…foundation. You decide.

I hear ya though. You’ve said it a dozen times over the last seven years: “Abandon hope, all ye who enter here!” There’s no money in Songwriting. You can’t break into the business. But, if you’re in town, I’ll show you around.

Tell the students here on the campus of Songwriter101 about the real world deals you’ve made. As I recall your story, you stumbled wide-eyed into Nashville and got a cut almost immediately, Cut and Released to market by Shelby Lynne, if memory serves. What was the deal? Did you give up 100% of Publishing Royalties? What percentage of Songwriting Royalties did you sign away to get that cut? And other cuts. Tell them what your motive is, since it can’t be money.

There will always be another song to be written. Someone will write it. Why not you? http://www.garyeandrews.com

 
     
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Gary E. Andrews Joined Apr 12, 2005
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Feb 12, 2018, 09:49 PM

Gary,

Absolutely we gave 100% of the publishing rights. To Tree Publishing at that time, which was bought out by Sony. Tree was tied into a deal with CBS records (the producer, Billy Sherrill. Was a staff producer for CBS. he produced the track. CBS was the motion picture company that produced the movie, ANOTHER PAIR OF ACES, and Shelby included it on her first album, “SUNRISE” produced by Billy Sherrill. Had they not gotten that, it would not have been included in anything.
I also had a publishing deal for six years and have independent songs on multiple companies, including Sony again, on the Frankie Ballard stuff. I have never been interested in publishing because they bear the brunt of the costs. They bear the costs of staffs, offices, the production, the demos, song pluggers, everything that costs, is what they pay for.
I have no interest in publishing because that is not my interest in songs and never has been. It is accounting, bueracracy, and politics, and is the least interesting part of the entire business. I have no, and never will have any interest in any of that. As a matter of fact, I am always looking for ANYONE else to bear the costs.

Publishing started losing money in the 90’s, and more and more publishing companies went out of business due to the costs of being in business. That left a few major companies, which are what are there now.
In the “successful business model” successful writers form their own publishing companies, and develop artists. Again, bearing the costs of that. Then as they get more successful, they pair up with the major companies, again to split the costs. This is why you get Taelor Swift’s Big Machine/Sony ATV. Or The Beatles “Northern Songs/Sony ATV.” As they get more successful, they will buy more of their rights back from the parent company. Same as going to a bank for a loan. You pay back the money with interest.

This is the best way it has been described to me. “Publishing is what you earn BACK after you buy your percentages as your negotiating position changes.” This was described by me as a co-writer,  Jim McBride, who had a few decent hits until one of the guys he had worked with for a few years, named Alan Jackson, got his own record deal. Their first number one was called “WAY DOWN YONDER ON THE CHATTAHOOCHIE” which was an enormous success. it sold a lot of product, and sent Alan on his meteoric career. At first, jim assigned the publishing to the company producing and developing Alan. That was a combination of Curb and Arista. All these companies have dozens of side people all involved.

But that allowed him access to Alan as a co-writer as Alan rose to fame. With each successive hit, Jim’s reputation rose as well as working with other stars. Finally he was owning the majority of all of his publishing.

So essentially it is this.
You need ACCESS to artists to be in there in the first place. Publishing is the incentive you provide for people to work with you over other people. Those people have been in the business long before you, so you have to play the game by THEIR rules until you are in a position to control your own.

There are still people that make money. But they create demand for their product and build what they do step by step. And the ones that keep their costs affordable and do as much as they can themselves, are able to negotiate more of that as they go along. All depends on your success rate. Or failure rate.

But at ANY rate, you are playing on teams. You are PART of the team. Just like a football team that has a great quarterback. That is good, but you also have to have a great line, running backs, ends, people that can surround and help you win the games. And you have to have a great DEFENSE so you get the ball more times.

Same with songwriters and anyone in this. They have to have ARTISTS, who carry the song to the levels they can’t get to themselves.
they have to have publishers who can help them get to the artists.
They have to have producers, musicians, studios, video directors, agents, managers, lawyers, who provide the team they develop to get them to labels.
They have to have labels that get the songs out there, have the political connections and the financing needed to get product to the public.
They have to resonate with the public so that it creates demand for the product.
They have to stand above their competition and continue the momentum created.
Then they have to repeat that. All the time.

Most never get to that point. But they are all going to have to be involved with a team.

I had some things to do with helping Frankie Ballard put the pieces together for his deal. My role was in the early stages of development.
I did not want to go any further because I am not interested in baby sitting or the other things that go with management or the other elements of a career.
This morning I heard Frankie’s voice on the current Hardee’s commercial on his song “SUNSHINE AND WHISKEY”.
That’s what is interesting to me. The fact that it is not one of the songs I wrote with him doesn’t matter to me at all.

But I know how all that stuff comes together. That;s why I say the song is the foundation. But the rest are all things that happen with teams. A lot of people and a lot of breaks have to go that way.

MAB

 
     
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MBarne4908 Joined Jul 29, 2010
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Feb 12, 2018, 09:52 PM

And by the way, we didn’t sign ANY of the songwriters rights. We collected all of those. Quite nicely by the way. National motion pictures pay quite well. More than compensated for anything we gave up.

The market has changed quite a bit now. Artists will not only ask but INSIST on writers share or they or their companies will not allow them to cut the song. So once again, each writer has to decide for themselves what it means to them. To me, it means I had a cut on a subsequent Grammy Award Winning artist, who is a darling among the independent world. That is always a pretty cool thing.

MAB

 
     
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MBarne4908 Joined Jul 29, 2010
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